season-after-season-header

Reading a Seed Catalog with Margaret Roach, AHS, Corona Tools

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Mon, Dec, 15, 2014 @ 11:12 AM

How to Read a Seed Catalog: Margaret Roach’s Tips to Make You an Informed Customer Who Can Shop Smarter this Year

AHS-Plantchat-12-15-14

The American Horticultural Society and Corona Tools are proud to have famed garden author Margaret Roach as a guest this week on #Plantchat.

Stop! Before you read the appetizing seed catalogs dropping daily in your mailbox, join us at #plantchat on Monday, December 15 from 2-3 p.m. ET. Seed enthusiast Margaret Roach will share her seed shopping rules, teach you how to  see through the sales pitches to what’s really going into those pretty seed packs, and help you find some unusual seeds to make your edible garden even more satisfying this year.

The American Horticultural Society is honored to host Margaret Roach as a special guest on #plantchat this week. Margaret blogs at A Way to Garden, based on experiences in her Hudson Valley garden and her years as Garden Editor and Executive Vice President/Editorial Editor at Martha Stewart Omnimedia. Margaret has written three books, and is offering two of them as prizes during #plantchat.

Please bring your own ideas about what you look for in seed catalogs, and other unusual seed sources.

PRIZES

Prizes this week are Margaret’s two books, and a membership in the American Horticultural Society – use these as gifts or keep them for yourself.

You're Invited!

Join @CoronaTools and #Plantchat co-partner, American Horticultural Society Digital Communications Manager Charlotte Germane @AHS_Gardening, along with guest host famed garden author Margaret Roach @MargaretRoach, This week's topic is Tips and Hints for Reading Those Seed Catalogs. The live chat begins Monday, December 15, 2014 at 11 a.m. PST / 2 p.m. EST, were we come together with green industry experts and fellow horticultural tweeps each week to discuss all things related to plants and horticulture, since 2014.

Discussion Overview 

Share your thoughts and get information from Margaret and the American Horticultural Society about:

Two Key Questions - before you even open a seed catalog.

GMO Seeds - Why you don’t need to worry about buying GMO seeds.

Organic Seeds - Three reasons to grow organic seeds.

Which Seeds Will Succeed for You? - The best (and free) source of information

Kicking Back! - When to go wild with seed catalogs.

 

Join the Conversation

Plantchat logo on Corona Tools

Don’t miss out on this exciting topic and join the conversation via Twitter. Just sign into #plantchat with your Twitter ID and you can follow the conversation and share with the community. Be sure to add the hastag to all your tweets or join us in the plantchat room on Tweetchat.  They will automatically add it for you and it's easy to watch the conversation as it happens!

If you do miss the live event, you can still access the Storify recap, accessible 24/7 that will be posted following the live chat. The transcript includes all the information and links shared during the discussion. 

About Plantchat

Connect and share with the green industry leaders live on Twitter and 24/7 to learn and share about hot topics in the green industry. Now plantchat is part of the Green Industry Leaders Network (GILN) presented by Corona and its partners.  We are an alliance of professional organizations who are advancing the horticulture, tree care, and landscaping industries. 

Topics: Corona Tools, #Plantchat, AHS, Margaret Roach, Tips on Seed Catalogs

Grow Healthy Citrus Indoors with AHS and Corona Tools

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Thu, Nov, 06, 2014 @ 11:11 AM

AHS Citrus 11 10 14The American Horticultural Society and Corona Tools are proud to have two garden greats as #Plantchat co-hosts this week: Citrus expert Kerry Beane, at Four Winds Growers, a leading producer of dwarf citrus trees; and famed garden author Margaret Roach.  

This week there are great prizes for the top tweeters during the #Plantchat hour:  

  • Most active tweeter gets to choose a 1-year old dwarf citrus tree from those in stock at Four Winds Growers and a ComfortGEL Fruit and Veggie Shear from Corona.
  • Second and third most active tweeters each win a Corona ComfortGEL Fruit & Veggie Shear (for pruning and harvesting indoor citrus). 

Bring your knowledge of growing citrus in containers to #Plantchat and bring your questions too!

You're Invited!

Join @CoronaTools and #Plantchat co-partner, American Horticultural Society Digital Communications Manager Charlotte Germane @AHS_Gardening, along with guest hosts Citrus expert Kerry Beane @MyFourWinds, E-Commerce Director at Four Winds Growers, a leading producer of dwarf citrus trees; and famed garden author Margaret Roach @MargaretRoach, who recently wrote about indoor citrus at her popular blog, A Way to Garden.  This week's topic is Growing Healthy Citrus Indoors. The live chat begins Monday, November 10, 2014 at 11 a.m. PST / 2 p.m. EST, were we come together with green industry experts and fellow horticultural tweeps each week to discuss all things related to plants and horticulture, since 2014.

Discussion Overview  

Selection - Which citrus do best as indoor container plants? 

Container-grown - Which is the most popular citrus to grow in a container? 

Indoors/Outdoors - What’s the best time of year to move the potted citrus outdoors? 

Yields - How long until your container citrus sets fruit?   

Organic Pest Control - What are easy and organic ways to control pests on indoor citrus?

Join the Conversation

Plantchat logo on Corona Tools

Don’t miss out on this exciting topic and join the conversation via Twitter. Just sign into #plantchat with your Twitter ID and you can follow the conversation and share with the community. Be sure to add the hastag to all your tweets or join us in the plantchat room on Tweetchat.  They will automatically add it for you and it's easy to watch the conversation as it happens!

If you do miss the live event, you can still access the Storify recap, accessible 24/7 that will be posted following the live chat. The transcript includes all the information and links shared during the discussion. 

About Plantchat

Connect and share with the green industry leaders live on Twitter and 24/7 to learn and share about hot topics in the green industry. Now plantchat is part of the Green Industry Leaders Network (GILN) presented by Corona and its partners.  We are an alliance of professional organizations who are advancing the horticulture, tree care, and landscaping industries. 

Topics: Corona Tools, #Plantchat, AHS, Grow Citrus Indoors, Margaret Roach, Kerry Beane

Bulbapalooza of Spring-flowering Bulbs with AHS and Corona Tools

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Thu, Oct, 16, 2014 @ 08:10 AM


GrapeHyacinthsSpring flowering bulbs enliven the landscape and are invaluable for adding bright color to the garden in early spring. Y
ou know you’re a “real gardener” when cool weather makes you long to plant bulbs for next spring. Bring your lists of classic bulbs to grow, unusual bulbs you like, bulbs you’d like to try, and companion plants for bulbs, to a bulbapalooza on a group #Plantchat Monday, October 20 at 11 am PT / 2 pm ET 

We’ll be chatting about planting techniques, the best-of-the-best daffodils for hot and cold zones, bulbs that will be carefree additions to your garden, unusual alliums to add to your mix, and suggestions for bulbs as companion plants to perennials you probably already have in your garden.

You're Invited! 

Join @CoronaTools and #Plantchat co-partner, American Horticultural Society Digital Communications Manager Charlotte Germane @AHS_Gardening  for this week's topic, “Something Old, Something New” in Fall-Planted Bulbs. The live chat begins Monday, October 20, 2014 at 11 a.m. PST / 2 p.m. EST, were we come together with green industry experts and fellow horticultural tweeps each week to discuss all things related to plants and horticulture, since 2014.

Discussion Overview  

Planting techniques

Best-of-the-Best daffodils for hot and cold zones

Carefree Bulbs that will be carefree additions to your garden

Unsual Alliums to add to your mix

Companion Plants Suggestions for bulbs to accompany your perennials 

Join the Conversation

Plantchat logo on Corona Tools

Don’t miss out on this exciting topic and join the conversation via Twitter. Just sign into #plantchat with your Twitter ID and you can follow the conversation and share with the community. Be sure to add the hastag to all your tweets or join us in the plantchat room on Tweetchat.  They will automatically add it for you and it's easy to watch the conversation as it happens!

If you do miss the live event, you can still access the Storify recap, accessible 24/7 that will be posted following the live chat. The transcript includes all the information and links shared during the discussion. 

About Plantchat

Connect and share with the green industry leaders live on Twitter and 24/7 to learn and share about hot topics in the green industry. Now plantchat is part of the Green Industry Leaders Network (GILN) presented by Corona and its partners.  We are an alliance of professional organizations who are advancing the horticulture, tree care, and landscaping industries.  Register now to get weekly updates of upcoming chats, links to transcripts, chat reminders and more!  Register now on the GILN website!

photo by Geri Laufer

Topics: Corona Tools, AHS, fall planted bulbs, spring flowering bulbs

Barrier Plantings with AHS and Corona Tools

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Thu, Sep, 18, 2014 @ 12:09 PM


Opuntia engelmannii resized 600Living barriers made of thorny or spikey plants become silent guardians of landscapes that are enclosed this way. In #Plantchat, we'll discuss the use of spikey solutions to reroute traffic patterns, and some examples of living obstacles that will help to prevent intruders and keep passers-by on designated walkways. See the AHS article, Beautiful Barriers, for the inside scoop!

You're Invited to Tweet 

Join @CoronaTools and #Plantchat co-partner, American Horticultural Society Digital Communications Manager Charlotte Germane @AHS_Gardening  for this week's topic, Organic Fruits and Berries. The live chat begins Monday, Septembe 22, 2014 at 11 a.m. PST / 2 p.m. EST, were we come together with green industry experts and fellow horticultural tweeps each week to discuss all things related to plants and horticulture, since 2014.

Discussion Overview  

Thorny Barriers - reroute garden "jaywalkers" 

Protect the Perimeter - deter intruders

Blocking Danger Zones - protect people from ditches and steep slopes

Cautions - keep thorns away from small children and pets

Join the Conversation

Plantchat logo on Corona Tools

Don’t miss out on this exciting topic and join the conversation via Twitter. Just sign into #plantchat with your Twitter ID and you can follow the conversation and share with the community. Be sure to add the hastag to all your tweets or join us in the plantchat room on Tweetchat.  They will automatically add it for you and it's easy to watch the conversation as it happens!

If you do miss the live event, you can still access the Storify recap, accessible 24/7 that will be posted following the live chat. The transcript includes all the information and links shared during the discussion. 

About Plantchat

Connect and share with the green industry leaders live on Twitter and 24/7 to learn and share about hot topics in the green industry. Now plantchat is part of the Green Industry Leaders Network (GILN) presented by Corona and its partners.  We are an alliance of professional organizations who are advancing the horticulture, tree care, and landscaping industries.  Register now to get weekly updates of upcoming chats, links to transcripts, chat reminders and more!  Register now on the GILN website!

photo courtesy of Wildflower.org 

Topics: Corona Tools, #Plantchat, AHS, Thorny Barrier Plants

Salvias Add Color, Movement to Garden with AHS and Corona Tools

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Fri, Aug, 15, 2014 @ 14:08 PM

Mealycup Sage

Easy-care garden plants, Salvias or sages as they are called interchangeably, are a large genus that includes annuals, biennials, perennials and small shrubs. Colorful Salvias can serve as the mainstay of the spring to summer, or late summer to fall garden border. Salvia is one of the many beloved members of the Mint Family, and has attributes like aromatic leaves that are paired two-by-two down square stems, two-lipped, bright flowers filled with nectar, and a long bloom season. 

Salvias, including the familiar kitchen sage, produce spikes of small, densely packed flowers atop aromatic foliage and are heat- and drought-tolerant beauties. They bloom in shades of blue, violet, red, pink, and white. Different varieties fill in the garden from 18 inches to 5 feet tall. 

Join the American Horticultural Society this week to chat about your favorite late summer and fall blooming Salvias on #Plantchat!

You're Invited to Tweet 

Join @CoronaTools and #plantchat co-partner, Digital Communications Manager Charlotte Germane of the American Horticultural Society (AHS) @AHS_Gardening for this week's topic, Salvias add color and movement to your late summer/fall garden. The live chat begins Monday, August 18, 2014 at 11 a.m. PST / 2 p.m. EST, were we come together with green industry experts and fellow horticultural tweeps each week to discuss all things related to plants and horticulture, since 2014.

Discussion Overview 

Late Summer Color -Salvia can be tender or hardy, but no matter where your garden is, use salvias for a burst of late summer color that persists in to the fall.

Wide Variety - With almost 1,000 species in this genus, you can find colors and heights that add to your garden picture – and it’s likely the deer won’t photobomb your picture. Salvias are often deer-resistant, although of course it depends on the species, the herd of deer (and how hungry they are). Ask your neighboring gardeners which salvias their deer ignore.

Culture for Sages - Salvias need full sun and well-drained soil. If you’re growing them as perennials, cut them back in winter to keep them from getting too woody.

Native Wildflowers - Some salvias are native to the Midwest, Southeast, and Texas.

Bee Forage - Salvias will feed the bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds and add an aerial ballet to your garden.

Join the Conversation

Plantchat logo on Corona Tools

Don’t miss out on this exciting topic and join the conversation via Twitter. Just sign into #plantchat with your Twitter ID and you can follow the conversation and share with the community. Be sure to add the hastag to all your tweets or join us in the plantchat room on Tweetchat.  They will automatically add it for you and it's easy to watch the conversation as it happens!

If you do miss the live event, you can still access the Storify recap, accessible 24/7 that will be posted following the live chat. The transcript includes all the information and links shared during the discussion. 

About Plantchat

Connect and share with the green industry leaders live on Twitter and 24/7 to learn and share about hot topics in the green industry. Now plantchat is part of the Green Industry Leaders Network (GILN) presented by Corona and its partners.  We are an alliance of professional organizations who are advancing the horticulture, tree care, and landscaping industries.  Register now to get weekly updates of upcoming chats, links to transcripts, chat reminders and more!  Register now on the GILN website!

Topics: Corona Tools, #Plantchat, gardening, AHS, Salvia, color, movement

Monarch Butterfly in Crisis: A Plantchat Discussion

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Mon, Jul, 21, 2014 @ 10:07 AM

Monarch AHSButterflies are important pollinators, yet they are facing a population crisis. According to the Natural Resources Defence Blog, "the number of monarch butterflies that migrates across the United States each year and overwinters in the forests of Mexico has dropped to an all-time low. The 2014 Monarch census put the population at 33.5 million individuals. Although the number of butterflies varies from year to year, this estimate is a precipitous drop from a high of 1 billion in 1997 and down from a long term average of 350 million over the last 15 years." This week's #Plantchat focuses on the Monarch Butterfly, and offers tips and strategies on how John Q. Public can help to mitigate their habitat destruction. 

You're Invited to Tweet 

Join @CoronaTools and #plantchat co-partner, American Horticultural Society Digital Communications Manager Charlotte Germane @AHS_Gardening for the topic, Monarch Butterfly Crisis and How You Can Help. The live chat begins Monday, June 21, 2014 at 11 a.m. PST / 2 p.m. EST, were we come together with green industry experts and fellow horticultural tweeps each week to discuss all things related to plants and horticulture, since 2014.

Discussion Overview 

Startling Drop in Monarch Population -Last winter was the lowest number of over-wintering of Monarchs in Mexico. 

One Reason for Monarch Decline -The startling drop in the Monarch population is the farm use of Roundup-Ready soybeans, along with the use of this herbicide to kill milkweed. 

What can Gardeners Do? - Plant Milkweeds in home and community gardens 

Create Monarch Habitats - Home Gardeners can create certified Monarch habitats for both adult monarchs and their immature offspring. 

Participate in the Monarch Count - Become a Citizen Scientist and track/watch Monarchs with Journey North (on Twitter, @JourneyNorthOrg).  

Join the Conversation

Plantchat logo on Corona ToolsDon’t miss out on this exciting topic and join the conversation via Twitter. Just sign into #plantchat with your Twitter ID and you can follow the conversation and share with the community. Be sure to add the hastag to all your tweets or join us in the plantchat room on Tweetchat.  They will automatically add it for you and it's easy to watch the conversation as it happens!

If you do miss the live event, you can still access the Storify recap, accessible 24/7 that will be posted following the live chat. The transcript includes all the information and links shared during the discussion. 

About Plantchat

Connect and share with the green industry leaders live on Twitter and 24/7 to learn and share about hot topics in the green industry. Plantchat is part of the Green Industry Leaders Network (GILN) presented by Corona and its partners.  We are an alliance of professional organizations who are advancing the horticulture, tree care, and landscaping industries.  Register now to get weekly updates of upcoming chats, links to transcripts, chat reminders and more!  Register now on the GILN website!

Topics: Corona Tools, #Plantchat, AHS, Monarch Butterfly Crisis

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