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Overcoming the Plant Fear Factor

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Fri, May, 31, 2019 @ 21:05 PM

We often talk about the therapeutic aspects of gardening, working in the soil and reducing stress in our day to day lives. It's such a great activity with numerous benefits. So why doesn't everyone  want to have a garden? We'll tell that to someone who's hortiphobic, a fear of growing plants, and they are likely to break out in a cold sweat and stress just thinking about it. It's almost like having a pet that you need to feed and care for. And if you forget to water it, it will die. Who needs that kind of stress? If that's you, you're not alone. Many Americans fear growing anything whether it's one plant, or an entire garden. This post is designed to take the fear factor out of plants, so you can move closer to a stress-free lifestyle that takes advantage of all that gardening can provide. Read on to learn how you can overcome your fear of growing plants.

What Makes Someone Hortiphobic?

Okay, you're convinced that caring and nurturing a plant of any kind, is not for you. It's possible that you suffered a traumatic plant-related event in your life, and Botanophobia set in. Maybe an episode of severe poison ivy, or you got stung in the nose by a bee while smelling a flower. Or suffer guilt over killing that poinsettia you received the holidays. All very real and potentially traumatic experiences. If you fall into any of these categories, there's still hope!

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Moving Past the Fear

If you identify yourself as a person with a black thumb, rest assured, there is a plant out there for you. Even if you have a killed a plant or two before. It could just mean it was the wrong plant for you. Or the environment wasn't ideal. Or you kept an outdoor plant, indoors. Whatever the case, failure is an option. All it means is it wasn't a good fit and it's an opportunity to try something new. If you like indoor plants, but that orchid you picked up at the garden center, perished after being in your home, that's okay. Try another plant that does well in those same conditions. It may be time to try a succulent or cactus. Point is, there is something out there for everyone at every level of gardening experience. Check out our recent podcast Trends in Indoor Plants, for some great ideas on where to start.

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Fear of Plant Commitment

What if you are the person who is always on the go? You like to travel or work and home life is especially active? You don't have time to care for plants. Yes, there are plants for you too. There are plants that can survive on very little water or light, so you can be gone for weeks and not worry about them dying. And If you have issues with a long term commitment, try some annuals in a container on the porch or deck. When they die back in the fall or winter, that's the nature of annuals, so no long term commitments are required and you will still have been successful!

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WIIFM?

If you're still on the fence about trying to grow even one plant, it's worth considering what's in it for you. Yes, you need to provide a some water and general care for plants to do well. However there are studies that have shown a direct correlation to gardening and reducing stress levels. Plants have a therapeutic quality that is calming. Working in soil has been shown to boost our mood, due to a harmless bacteria, mycobacterium vaccae, helping to better cope with anxiety and depression. They can ratchet up the curb appeal of your home. As well as spruce up your indoor living spaces for sharing the perfect #plantsofinstagram and #shelfie post.  And guys, let's face it, women appreciate a guy who can nurture and care for something.

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Conquer Your Fear

So if you are among those who fear plants or swear you have a black thumb and kill everything, you're not alone. Even the most studied horticulturists out there, have killed a plant or two in their day. Toss out those sad, dusty fake plants in the corner, and start with an easy live plant that won't hold outright neglect against you. You'll begin to experience the joy of seeing that first flower or when a new leaf emerges. This is a sure sign that you are doing something right. It will boost your plant confidence, make your house feel a more like a home, as you start channeling all the stress going on in your life into your plants. 

 

 

Topics: gardening, Landscaping, shrubs

Demystifying Hydrangeas with Proven Winners

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Fri, Nov, 02, 2018 @ 18:11 PM
an introduction to the many types of hydrangeas

GILN Social Media Icon-1Did you know that hydrangeas are the most Googled shrub and flower on the planet? They are a favorite for many gardeners, yet often times they confuse one for another. Different types of hydrangea produce different types of flowers, can thrive in different zones, and have different requirements when it comes to pruning. We caught up with Stacey Hirvela, of the #1 plant brand, Proven Winners and she helps shed some light on this amazing shrub.

The 6 Types of Hydrangeas

If you’ve ever had a hydrangea shrub that hasn’t bloomed or wasn’t the mop-head burst of color you had expected, chances are, it’s related to the type you have. Whether you pruned it back when you shouldn’t have, or put the wrong one in the wrong spot, it can lead to disappointment for any gardener. The folks at Proven Winners joined us for a podcast to help make sense of all the types. 

Hydrangea PodcastKey discussion points include;

  • What makes these hydrangeas similar?
  • What makes them different?
  • Define what it means to bloom on old wood and bloom on new wood.
  • Explain how this affects pruning your hydrangea.
  • Describe how to prune the types of hydrangeas.
  • Why reblooming hydrangeas bloom on old and new wood – what does this mean for gardeners and for pruning?

Since there is so much information about hydrangeas to cover in one podcast, this episode is part 1 of 2. Download this and listen on a walk or out in the garden. Proven Winners also has this free handy guide, Demystifying Hydrangeas so you don't have to take notes. And if you have questions, join us live via Twitter.


Listen  Now, Chat Later

Since 2014,  Corona along with its industry partners, American Horticultural Society and Proven Winners, has been hosting plant-related topics via Twitter.  The new podcast gives chat participants an opportunity to hear the chat take place,  then  connect live with the host and guests. It's an opportunity to ask questions about the podcast, the general topic discussed or get more information on something that was shared. 

Chat Live and Win!

The live discussion takes place on 11/6/18 at 2PM ET. To join the discussion, log on to Twitter and search for #plantchat. If you are using Twitter, be sure to select "Latest" at the top to see the latest tweets. We'll also have plantchat prizes for those who listen to the podcast and can answer questions from it during the tweetup, including Corona tools! So listen to the podcast while you garden or commuting to the office then join us for the live chat!  And please share the good news on your favorite social networks too!

Resources

Be sure to connect with Proven Winners on Twitter and Facebook

Topics: #Plantchat, gardening, hydrangea, shrubs

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