season-after-season-header

Overcoming the Plant Fear Factor

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Fri, May, 31, 2019 @ 21:05 PM

We often talk about the therapeutic aspects of gardening, working in the soil and reducing stress in our day to day lives. It's such a great activity with numerous benefits. So why doesn't everyone  want to have a garden? We'll tell that to someone who's hortiphobic, a fear of growing plants, and they are likely to break out in a cold sweat and stress just thinking about it. It's almost like having a pet that you need to feed and care for. And if you forget to water it, it will die. Who needs that kind of stress? If that's you, you're not alone. Many Americans fear growing anything whether it's one plant, or an entire garden. This post is designed to take the fear factor out of plants, so you can move closer to a stress-free lifestyle that takes advantage of all that gardening can provide. Read on to learn how you can overcome your fear of growing plants.

What Makes Someone Hortiphobic?

Okay, you're convinced that caring and nurturing a plant of any kind, is not for you. It's possible that you suffered a traumatic plant-related event in your life, and Botanophobia set in. Maybe an episode of severe poison ivy, or you got stung in the nose by a bee while smelling a flower. Or suffer guilt over killing that poinsettia you received the holidays. All very real and potentially traumatic experiences. If you fall into any of these categories, there's still hope!

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Moving Past the Fear

If you identify yourself as a person with a black thumb, rest assured, there is a plant out there for you. Even if you have a killed a plant or two before. It could just mean it was the wrong plant for you. Or the environment wasn't ideal. Or you kept an outdoor plant, indoors. Whatever the case, failure is an option. All it means is it wasn't a good fit and it's an opportunity to try something new. If you like indoor plants, but that orchid you picked up at the garden center, perished after being in your home, that's okay. Try another plant that does well in those same conditions. It may be time to try a succulent or cactus. Point is, there is something out there for everyone at every level of gardening experience. Check out our recent podcast Trends in Indoor Plants, for some great ideas on where to start.

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Fear of Plant Commitment

What if you are the person who is always on the go? You like to travel or work and home life is especially active? You don't have time to care for plants. Yes, there are plants for you too. There are plants that can survive on very little water or light, so you can be gone for weeks and not worry about them dying. And If you have issues with a long term commitment, try some annuals in a container on the porch or deck. When they die back in the fall or winter, that's the nature of annuals, so no long term commitments are required and you will still have been successful!

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WIIFM?

If you're still on the fence about trying to grow even one plant, it's worth considering what's in it for you. Yes, you need to provide a some water and general care for plants to do well. However there are studies that have shown a direct correlation to gardening and reducing stress levels. Plants have a therapeutic quality that is calming. Working in soil has been shown to boost our mood, due to a harmless bacteria, mycobacterium vaccae, helping to better cope with anxiety and depression. They can ratchet up the curb appeal of your home. As well as spruce up your indoor living spaces for sharing the perfect #plantsofinstagram and #shelfie post.  And guys, let's face it, women appreciate a guy who can nurture and care for something.

BandB on Corona Tools

Conquer Your Fear

So if you are among those who fear plants or swear you have a black thumb and kill everything, you're not alone. Even the most studied horticulturists out there, have killed a plant or two in their day. Toss out those sad, dusty fake plants in the corner, and start with an easy live plant that won't hold outright neglect against you. You'll begin to experience the joy of seeing that first flower or when a new leaf emerges. This is a sure sign that you are doing something right. It will boost your plant confidence, make your house feel a more like a home, as you start channeling all the stress going on in your life into your plants. 

 

 

Topics: gardening, Landscaping, shrubs

Importance of Using the Right Type of Hand Pruner

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Tue, Apr, 30, 2019 @ 20:04 PM

One of the most interesting things we see quite often from gardeners and landscapers, is the confusion about which tool to use for the job. There seems to be a misconception, from beginners to advanced, that one tool is good enough for all jobs. This post sets the record straight when to use bypass pruners and when to anvil pruners. At the most basic level, bypass are ideal for pruning and cutting fresh, live green stems. This will make the cleanest cuts, allowing the plant to properly heal and promote new growth. For hard, dead wood, an anvil pruner cuts through this dense material easily, without risk to the plant or tree, and even your pruner. Read on to find out the why's for both and why not's of using these tool interchangeably. It will help protect your plants, your tools and yourself.

Corona bypass hand pruner blog post

Bypass Pruners - Cutting Live Stems and Branches

A bypass pruner has a cutting blade that passes a the non-cutting hook, much like a pair of scissors. The blade is sharped on one side with the flat, unsharpened on the side, passing the hook. When sharp and cutting live branches and stems, they make the cleanest cut on the plant, without any damage to the remaining stems. This is important as it helps the plant to heal from the cut, and encourages new growth. 

Corona FlexDIal bypass hand pruner

Anvil Pruners - Cutting Hard, Dead Wood

Unlike the bypass pruner, an anvil pruner has a blade that is sharped on both sides. This closes down on a flat anvil, which typically has a narrow channel for the cutting blade, as not to damage its sharpened edge. What makes this great for cutting hard, dead wood is, there is no risk of crushing any stems. In fact removing the old dead wood, help the plant direct energy towards new growth.

Corona Anvil hand pruner

The Why Not's for Using the Wrong Tools

This is where confusion and misconception happens is that many gardeners think, this one pruner will handle their all their small pruning jobs. However, using an anvil hand pruner on a live stem or branch, will likely crush it. In most cases, it will make the cut, the remaining branch gets crushed and damaged. The plant must recover from it and will be more susceptible to diseases and pests. This could ultimately kill the plant.

Using a bypass pruner on hard, dead wood can be plan disastrous. Since the wood is harder to cut, a gardener is likely to twist and torque their hand, causing the blade to cross over the hook. Not only will this kill your hand, once the cut is made, the blade will come down on the hook, rather than bypass it. This will cause the blade to become damaged or chipped. And the worst case, cause the blade to snap and potentially become a sharp projectile. Not only are you out a good hand pruner, since this is using the tool incorrectly and not covered under warranty, you could risk serious bodily injury to yourself

Do You REALLY Need Both?

It's best to assess what the job is and bring the correct tool for the task. You wouldn't use a screwdriver to drive in a nail. So if your if job is mostly cutting live stems and branches, a bypass pruner is your go to. If you are cutting out dead wood or even harder, denser plants and trees like mesquite, invest in a decent anvil pruner. Spending a little extra budget will ultimate save you from replacing your good bypass pruners down the road. Or replacing a plant that didn't survive due to a poor cut. Most importantly, a visit to the emergency room when a blade snaps and injures you.

Need more advice when it comes to pruning and proper tool care? Check out Corona's free Principles of Pruning guide packed with lots of helpful tips and information. 

 

Topics: gardening, Landscaping, garden tools, hand pruners

Get the Most from Your Garden this Season

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Thu, Mar, 07, 2019 @ 13:03 PM

Ask any gardener what they want most from their garden, and you're likely to hear, more produce, abundant blooms and perfectly shaped trees, shrubs and hedges. One of the best ways to help ensure that gardening nirvana is pruning. Experts know that well-pruned plants and trees will yield more fruit, bigger and better blooms and healthier plants. And with spring just around the corner, it's time to get the work done. You can do it quickly and efficiently with these 4 essential pruning tools; bypass pruners for fresh green stems, anvil pruners for removing and cutting out dead wood, bypass loppers for the bigger limbs and a folding hand saw to remove the bigger stuff. Done right, your trees and plants will reward you with a successful bounty, season after season. Not sure where to start? Keep reading for some great ideas and resources that can help.

Where to Start 

Pruning is an essential part of maintaining good tree and plant health, so don't shy away from it. Note that not all shrubs should be pruned at this time of year. Done at the wrong time of year, pruning could limit growth and flowers in the summer months. The best place to start is by downloading, Corona's  Principles of Pruning is a free guide that is packed with many of the basic how-to's for pruning confidently.

Timing Your Pruning is Key

Making the right cuts, at the right time with the right tool will help ensure a better crop of fruit, blooms and foliage. Joe Lamp'l of Growing a Greener World on PBS, shares some sage advice on Biggest Pruning Mistakes and How to Avoid Them in his Joe Gardener video series, presented by Corona Tools. For the hydrangea enthusiast, check out our two part podcast, Demystifying Hydrangeas with Proven Winners.

Corona Tools on Joe Gardener

Recommended Pruning Tools for the Job


FlexDIAL_on_Corona_ToolsPruning Live Stems & Branches
Prune live rose canes, trees, woody shrubs and vines with a bypass pruner. FlexDIAL® lets you adjust how wide the pruner opens, up to 3/4 in., to maximize cutting power and reduce hand fatigue when there is much work to be done. It provides gardeners with a custom fit for small to extra large hand sizes.

 

RatchetCUT on Corona ToolsPruning Deadwood
Dead tree branches, rose canes and thick vines can seriously damage a good pair of bypass pruners. Look for an anvil-style pruner like the RatchetCUT™ that helps power through tough deadwood. It makes a series of smaller, full-leverage cuts which is easier on your hands. It will save your favorite pair of bypass pruners and added hand stress when making a large cut.



DualLInk on Corona ToolsLive Limbs & Branches 1 - 2 in
A bypass lopper can be the ideal choice when cutting larger limbs and branches. Remember, while a lopper like the DualLINK™ Forged Bypass Lopper may be rated for cutting up to 2 inches, the larger the limb, the more upper body strength you'll need to successfully make the cut. If it's difficult to make a cut, look to a Corona hand saw to zip through the cut.

 

razortooth on corona toolsBranches & Limbs Greater Than 2 in
One of the easiest ways to tackle larger limbs and branches is a pruning saw. These are a must have for every gardener. Many are compact like the RazorTOOTH Saw® - 7 in Folding Saw that fit nicely in your tool pouch and can be tossed in a backpack when you're out on the trails. Some have an available replaceable blade option, making them a sound investment.

Spring Cleaning and Maintenance in Your Yard

While proper pruning helps ensure healthier plants and trees, it's also the ideal time to do spring clean up and maintenance in your yard. Take time to inspect your irrigation and drip systems for leaks which can result in wasted water, but also poorly irrigated plants and crops or brown spots in the lawn. Check out this podcast episode for 6 steps for saving up to 85% of landscape water use.

One of the most important maintenance tasks you can do is spreading a thick layer of mulch that will help suppress weeds, while helping the soil retain moisture throughout the hot, dry months. Want more great suggestions for effective spring cleaning projects that will get the most from your garden? Check out Greenpal's Spring Clean Up Guide.  

 

 

Topics: gardening, Landscaping, late-winter pruning

Emerald Ash Borer – Worst Invasive Tree Pest of this Generation?

Posted by Dr. David Coyle on Fri, Feb, 15, 2019 @ 13:02 PM

Despite bone chilling temperatures this winter, courtesy of the Polar Vortex, you would think that would be enough to wipe out one of the most invasive tree pests, the Emerald Ash Borer, a.k.a, EAB. But you'd be wrong. This single insect has been the demise of millions of North American Ash trees and their destructive reign continues. In this guest post, Dr. Dave Coyle, assistant professor at Clemson University, shares his insights on the EAB and how to deal with it. He was also a guest on the Green Industry Leaders Network podcast, Blurring the Tree Lines, discussing tree stress and pests like EAB, in urban, suburban and forest trees.

Where did EAB Come From?

Who would have thought that a little green beetle – not even an inch long – would cause billions of dollars in damage and lead to the death of millions of trees on this continent?  I mean, sure, it was always a possibility, but we’re currently living though one of the worst invasive species issues in our lifetime.

The emerald ash borer, (EAB for short, Fig. 1) was first discovered in 2002, but probably arrived in the late 1990, near Detroit, MI. It is now present in most of eastern North America (current distribution map) from APHIS.  The larvae or young of this beetle, feed on the phloem of ash trees (genus Fraxinus), and their feeding nearly always results in tree death.  Oh, and not just one type of ash tree – all of them: white, green, blue, pumpkin…if it’s a Fraxinusspecies, it’s susceptible to EAB. 

EAB on Corona Tools Blog

Figure 1. EAB adult.  Photo by Matt Bertone, NC State University.

How do I know if my Ash tree has EAB? 

If the tree starts declining, or losing foliage and branches, or has a sudden increase in woodpecker populations, they’re there trying to find and eat the EAB larvae, and often cause “ash blonding” (Fig. 2), your ash tree may have EAB.  

EAB2 on Corona Tools

Figure 2. Ash blonding.  Photo by David Coyle, Clemson University

It’s important to inspect your tree and look for little D-shaped holes (Fig. 3) – this is where the adults leave the tree once they’re fully developed.

EAB3 on Corona Tools

Figure 3. D-shaped holes made when EAB adults leave the tree.  Photo by David Coyle

Can I save my tree if it has EAB? 

Well that depends…if most of the crown still looks healthy, then probably.  There are many chemical treatments that work great to both prevent and treat EAB once a tree is infested.  There are biocontrol agents (other bugs that eat EAB), but these won’t usually save an individual tree – they’re good for keeping overall populations in check, and are most often used in natural areas.  It is important to note that in nearly all situations, treating a tree is cheaper than removing and replacing it.  And, trees provide many benefits.  The National Tree Benefit Calculator is a great resource to see the value of a tree.

The EAB Outlook

It’s difficult to determine exactly how many trees EAB has already killed, but the number is easily in the millions.  And, EAB is already present across much of eastern North America.  Will it get out West?  It’s likely...there’s already a population in Colorado.  Remember, by not moving firewood from place to place we can prevent the spread of EAB – this is one of the main ways invasive insects get transported to new places.  Our friends at dontmovefirewood.org have a lot of great resources on this topic.

The recent polar vortex had folks wondering if the cold temperatures might kill all the EAB.  I hate to burst your bubble (but I’m going to burst your bubble…), but the answer is no. Sure, in some places many EAB larvae likely died, but even this recent cold snap isn’t enough to kill all the EAB. Some died, yes – especially in colder areas like the northern U.S. and Canada.  But certainly not all of the EAB died.

Resources About EAB

InsideClemson_PicbyErinMurphyFor the latest resources on EAB, check out http://www.emeraldashborer.info/, a multi-state and multi-agency collaborative, and the great site by Purdue University. 

About the Author

Dr. Dave Coyle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Conservation at Clemson University.  He can be found on Twitter @drdavecoyle and Instagram. And listen to Dave's podcast, Blurring the Tree Lines, on the Green Industry Leaders Network.

Topics: #treechat, gardening, trees

Seed Selection, Storage and Saving Techniques

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Thu, Jan, 17, 2019 @ 17:01 PM

It may be the dead of winter with snow on the ground, but many gardeners are in a "seeding frenzy" and getting ready to plant their crops for this season. This is prime time for buying seeds and planting them to take advantage of short growing season. There are many great reasons for growing plants and vegetables from seeds. We caught up with the Seed Keeper Company on a recent Green Industry Leaders Network, #plantchat podcast everything you need to know. They share their passion and enthusiasm about the proper techniques to seed selection, storage and saving seeds to grow next season.

It Starts with Selection

If you are in the garden industry, you've likely met Carol Niec and Kerrie Rosenthal, owners of The Seed Keeper Company, an online resource and nifty product for storing and saving your seeds each season. SPOILER ALERT: We have one to giveaway to a lucky blog reader so stay tuned for your chance to win! They are both a wealth of information about the benefits of growing from seed, which can yield healthier plants and varieties you won't find at your local garden center.

Carol and Kerrie explain what you need to know about seed selection before you purchase. Deciding what food your family enjoys most influences what you plant. Planting at the right time of year depending on where you live. Most gardeners know their climate Hardiness Zone but the knowing your growing season based on your last spring and first fall Frost Dates is going to determine when you sow your seeds. And of course, some basics of knowing your soil type, light requirements do different seeds need?

Knowing the Seed LingoGILN Social Media Icon

Carol and Kerrie also explore an in-depth look at terms such as annual/perennial/biennial, organic, heirloom, native hybrid, GM
O and open-pollinated. Since seed packets are a source of abundant information, they recommend you choose reputable brands. Find out which ones they like best.

Storing and Saving Your Seeds 

Discover how to save your own seeds! Follow their “good and dry” guidelines, and keep your seeds in a cool (40F), dark and dry place in their Seed Keeper Deluxe organizer, inside paper or glassine packets and add silica desiccants. Did we mention we're giving one away??? 

Teaching the Importance of Seeds in Schools


Finally, as a way to give back to the community, Carol and Kerrie started the Seed Keeper Project and work with 51 school gardens each year, selected from all 50 states plus the District of Columbia. The Month of January is the time to nominate schools from your state, on their Facebook Page.  Corona Cares has participated in their Seed Keeper Project for nine years, and this year is donating three Corona Cares tool grants valued at $1,000 to each of three winning schools.

Win a Seed Keeper Deluxe

seedkeeper on Corona toolsAre you saving seeds? Please tell us in the comments below, and be entered to win a Seed Keeper Deluxe. Tell us how you currently organize leftover and saved seeds and why you would benefit from this handy organizer. The winner will be chosen at random and announced on January 31, 2019. Open to all US addresses and good luck!

Resources

Download and subscribe to the Green Industry Leaders Network podcast on Simplecast, iTunes or Google Play. Be sure to connect with Corona Tools and share your thoughts on this podcast. Be sure to connect with both our guest and with us on all our social media networks. Connect with Carol and Kerrie on TwitterFacebook and Instagram. Connect with Chris at Corona Tools on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

Topics: #Plantchat, gardening, seeds

Getting the Most from Your Garden This Winter Season

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Mon, Nov, 26, 2018 @ 18:11 PM

The post-Thanksgiving rush is on to get ready for the holidays and the gardening season is quickly becoming a memory. There is still plenty to do during this season including decorating your home with festive decor. Instead of shopping at the same store as your neighbor for the latest yard ornaments, why not create a festive custom look, that costs you next to nothing? Your holiday decor just might be hiding in your backyard. Here's how to make a gorgeous garland with your own greens.  If you don't have greens in your yard, visit your local garden center and ask for leftover tree cuttings for no cost. We've also got some tips for helping out wildlife during the winter months.

Deck the Halls: Greens from your Garden 

Swag Bundles  Swag

 Materials & Supplies

  • Jute twine cut to the length of the garland you want + extra for hanging
  • Floral wire
  • Your favorite Corona Hand Pruners

Instructions

  • Cut 6-inch pieces of greenery from your favorite shrubs and ornamental grasses. Make sure to cut pieces of varying colors and textures. (What you cut depends on where you live.)
  • Make bundles of 3-5 pieces by wiring the cut ends of the pieces together. (You can bundle 3-5 cuttings from the same type of plant together or make bundles with a few different types of cuttings in each bunch.)
  • Tie one end of your piece of twine to a doorknob and hold the twine taut. 
  • Start wiring the bundles to the twine. (Leave enough twine at the end to hang the garland.) Hold the first bundle, cut ends up, and tightly wrap the wire around the twine and the bundle. For the first one it helps to poke the end of the wire through the twine once to hold the bundle in place. Do not cut the wire! Use the same piece of wire for the whole garland for extra strength.
  • Place the next bundle along the twine about 3/4 of the way down the first bundle. Wire the second bundle to the twine and one piece from the first bundle. (This helps hide the twine once you hang up the garland.)
  • Continue wiring bundles to the twine until it is covered. 
  • Hang up and enjoy!

Pro Tip: Hide Your Cuts

Keep in mind that fall isn't the ideal time to fully prune anything, so you're going to want to take a few cuttings from a variety of different shrubs. 

Here's the easiest way to hide your pruning cuts: Cut pieces for your garland from the underside of the branch. Works like a charm! If that isn't possible, try to remove a piece of branch that has another piece drooping over it, so the cut will be hidden. 

 

Bird on Coneflower

Fall Cleanup Part 2: Leave a Little for Wildlife 

Still working on fall cleanup? Make sure not to completely mow down everything in your garden. While that's tempting, it doesn't leave much for visiting wildlife to snack on. Here are our tips for easing up on cleanup so you can enjoy visits from your feathered (and furry) friends. 

  • Allow ornamental grasses to stand until snow or ice knocks them down. Their flowers are a good food source for birds and small mammals.

  • Let perennials dry and stand as well. Goldfinches love coneflower seeds and you'll love seeing their bright plumage in your garden. The insides of these plants also provide winter habitat for native bees and insects.

  • Leave some (but not all) leaves. It's not a good idea to allow dense mats of leaves to form on your lawn or in your flower beds. (Chop them up with your mower or leaf shredder and use them as mulch.) You can move a few piles of leaves to the edge of your property, though, to provide homes for overwintering native insects and butterflies. 

 

Tell us your winter gardening tips 

With so many regions and climates, there are many different activities to enjoy in the garden during the winter. Whether you're planting cool season crops, protecting your roses from the winter freeze or draining your irrigation system, we want to hear what tips work for you. Please share a comment, include your garden zone and tell us what works best for you during the winter garden season. 

Topics: gardening, Landscaping, Winter Garden Prep, Holiday Decorating Like the Pros, holiday

How to Maintain the Land for Your Tiny House

Posted by Molli McGee on Thu, Nov, 15, 2018 @ 12:11 PM
guest post from tiny HOUSE society

tinyhouse on Corona Tools blogLiving in a tiny home, or any home for that matter, involves more than just the structure itself. It’s also important to consider the land the home sits on. For those of you who haven’t heard of tiny houses, they are typically no more than 500 square feet and can be built on a trailer or foundations (something that can play an important role in your landscaping). Let’s take a look at some aspects of maintaining the land for your tiny home that you’ll need to consider; as well as tools you might want to have on hand to do the job right! (image Source - Unsplash )

Accessibility

Corona_Tools_RazorTOOTH_SawDeciding how best to access your tiny home is an important, and often left-too-late part of the process. Particularly in the case of a tiny house on wheels, having enough space cleared to drive your home in and out on a trailer is a must. The clearing process will likely include pruning back trees and bushes that could obstruct the path of your tiny home.

A great tool you’ll want in your arsenal is the RazorTOOTH Saw to help cut down any overgrown branches. Another key reason to prune trees around your tiny home is to encourage the health of the trees themselves. If you’re interested in keeping your tiny house more private, keeping those trees trimmed of dead branches is important.


NEED PRUNING TIPS? Download Corona's FREE Principles of Pruning and Principles of Planting guides.


Underground Connections

Laying pipes is another crucial aspect of tiny living for any tiny homeowner who plans to have more permanent amenities. While you could pay someone to do the work for you, you sure can’t beat the sense of accomplishment that comes with putting in the work yourself. Here’s where owning the right shovel comes into play. The right shovel can mean the difference between a great job or a passable one. Since tiny living is all about quality over quantity, we chose the Trench Digging Shovel for all of our trench-digging needs.

ComfortGEL cultivator on Corona ToolsGardening 

For many tiny homeowners, self-sufficient and sustainable ways of living are extremely important. Whether you’re interested in a flower garden or a crop of vegetables, owning the right tools can make it an enjoyable process. Before planting seeds, it’s important to prime the soil to ensure the success of the crop. Corona's lightweight Cultivator will help you get your earth prepped for all the veggies and flowers you could ever want. All you need now is a green thumb.

The Takeaway

As mentioned previously, tiny living is about more than just the house itself--it’s also about the land you put it on. After you find a home for your tiny home, using the best tools on the market to help maintain that home is the next step. Ensuring that the land for your tiny house is properly prepared is an important part of owning a home that suits your needs.

About Molli McGee

Molli Headshot1 copyMolli is a U.S. citizen currently living in Cape Town, South Africa. Aside from writing about tiny houses, Molli loves to be at the beach and eat food (often at the same time). As an avid surfer and beach-goer, she does her best to promote a sustainable way of living on tinysociety.co

Topics: gardening, Landscaping, landscape tools

Demystifying Hydrangeas with Proven Winners

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Fri, Nov, 02, 2018 @ 18:11 PM
an introduction to the many types of hydrangeas

GILN Social Media Icon-1Did you know that hydrangeas are the most Googled shrub and flower on the planet? They are a favorite for many gardeners, yet often times they confuse one for another. Different types of hydrangea produce different types of flowers, can thrive in different zones, and have different requirements when it comes to pruning. We caught up with Stacey Hirvela, of the #1 plant brand, Proven Winners and she helps shed some light on this amazing shrub.

The 6 Types of Hydrangeas

If you’ve ever had a hydrangea shrub that hasn’t bloomed or wasn’t the mop-head burst of color you had expected, chances are, it’s related to the type you have. Whether you pruned it back when you shouldn’t have, or put the wrong one in the wrong spot, it can lead to disappointment for any gardener. The folks at Proven Winners joined us for a podcast to help make sense of all the types. 

Hydrangea PodcastKey discussion points include;

  • What makes these hydrangeas similar?
  • What makes them different?
  • Define what it means to bloom on old wood and bloom on new wood.
  • Explain how this affects pruning your hydrangea.
  • Describe how to prune the types of hydrangeas.
  • Why reblooming hydrangeas bloom on old and new wood – what does this mean for gardeners and for pruning?

Since there is so much information about hydrangeas to cover in one podcast, this episode is part 1 of 2. Download this and listen on a walk or out in the garden. Proven Winners also has this free handy guide, Demystifying Hydrangeas so you don't have to take notes. And if you have questions, join us live via Twitter.


Listen  Now, Chat Later

Since 2014,  Corona along with its industry partners, American Horticultural Society and Proven Winners, has been hosting plant-related topics via Twitter.  The new podcast gives chat participants an opportunity to hear the chat take place,  then  connect live with the host and guests. It's an opportunity to ask questions about the podcast, the general topic discussed or get more information on something that was shared. 

Chat Live and Win!

The live discussion takes place on 11/6/18 at 2PM ET. To join the discussion, log on to Twitter and search for #plantchat. If you are using Twitter, be sure to select "Latest" at the top to see the latest tweets. We'll also have plantchat prizes for those who listen to the podcast and can answer questions from it during the tweetup, including Corona tools! So listen to the podcast while you garden or commuting to the office then join us for the live chat!  And please share the good news on your favorite social networks too!

Resources

Be sure to connect with Proven Winners on Twitter and Facebook

Topics: #Plantchat, gardening, hydrangea, shrubs

Basics of Growing Roses Successfully

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Fri, Oct, 26, 2018 @ 15:10 PM
Rosarian Susan fox, says there is a rose for everyone

GILN Social Media Icon-1Gardeners quite often mention that they love roses but they are too hard to grow. Or that they take too much time, they don’t have the space to grow them or roses just don’t do well. We caught up with Susan Fox, a noted rosarian on a recent Green Industry Leaders Network podcast, who covered some basics about roses and a personal guarantee, there is a rose out there for everyone!

Basics of Growing Roses

susan_fox_on_corona_tools2If you have never grown roses successfully, live in a cold climate or claim you have a black thumb, there is a rose for you. Susan shares some great insights on new roses available for gardeners, tips on seasonal care, varieties that will perform well, and resources she relies on when sharing this great news with budding rose growers.

Key discussion points include;

  • How do I know they will work in my garden?
  • What are some time-saving roses?
  • What are good roses for new gardeners to start out with?
  • How to know if roses will grow well in your zone.
  • Are there any options for gardens with partial sun?
  • What are some seasonal tasks gardeners should be doing?
  • Suggestions for small garden and containers roses.
  • Number one mistake people make when buying a rose?
  • What trends are on the horizon for roses?

Listen  Now, Chat Later

Since 2014,  Corona along with its industry partners, American Horticultural Society and Proven Winners, has been hosting plant-related topics via Twitter.  The new podcast gives chat participants an opportunity to hear the chat take place,  then  connect live with the host and guests. It's an opportunity to ask questions about the podcast, the general topic discussed or get more information on something that was shared. 

Chat Live and Win!

The live discussion takes place on 10/30/18 at 2PM ET. To join the discussion, log on to Twitter and search for #plantchat. If you are using Twitter, be sure to select "Latest" at the top to see the latest tweets. We'll also have plantchat prizes for those who listen to the podcast and can answer questions from it during the tweetup, including Corona tools! So listen to the podcast while you garden or commuting to the office then join us for the live chat!  And please share the good news on your favorite social networks too!

Resources

Be sure to connect with our host and guest on all their websites and social media networks. Visit Gaga's Garden and connect with her on Twitter and Facebook

Topics: #Plantchat, gardening, roses

Creating Gardens and Landscapes to Support Wildlife

Posted by Chris Sabbarese on Sat, May, 12, 2018 @ 15:05 PM
David Mizejewski Shares with American Horticultural Society on Plantchat Podcast

IMG_6716Corona presents the first Green Industry Leaders Network, #plantchat podcast, featuring National Wildlife Federation's, David Mizejewski.  The Garden for Wildlife™ movement, started 45 years ago to help gardeners plant with purpose. By supporting wildlife in gardens and landscapes, the movement is an effort to double the abundance of butterflies, birds and other  essential pollinators. On this episode, Beth Tuttle, president and CEO of American Horticultural Society, a founding partner of #plantchat, interviewed David to learn more about this fantastic program.

DavidMizejewski_smGarden for Wildlife

Our gardens and landscapes play an important role in supporting Earth's pollinators.  The types of trees, shrubs and plants you grow can create an ecosystem that helps sustain them. Providing the things they need to survive; water, food, shelter, and a place to raise their young. In this inaugural plantchat podcast, David talks about the Garden for Wildlife program and how each of us can get involved. Key discussion points include;

  • How and why did the National Wildlife Federation start the effort all those years ago?
  • What do plants and gardening have to do with wildlife? Most people don't want wildlife in their garden, right?
  • What do people need to do to create a wildlife habitat garden?
  • Why are native plants so important for wildlife?
  • What's a Certified Wildlife Habitat?  Why should people certify their yards and gardens?
  • Why are pollinators declining and how can gardens help?

Listen  Now, Chat Later

Since 2014,  Corona along with its industry partners, American Horticultural Society and Proven Winners, has been hosting plant-related topics via Twitter.  The new podcast gives chat participants an opportunity to hear the chat take place,  then  connect live with the host and guests. It's an opportunity to ask questions about the podcast, the general topic discussed or get more information on something that was shared. 

Chat Live via Twitter

The live discussion takes place on 5/29/18 at 2PM ET. To join the discussion, log on to Twitter and search for #plantchat. If you are using Twitter, be sure to select "Latest" at the top to see the latest tweets. We'll also have plantchat prizes for those who listen to the podcast and can answer questions from it during the tweetup, including Corona tools! So listen to the podcast while you garden or commuting to the office then join us for the live chat!  And please share the good news on your favorite social networks too!

Resources

Be sure to connect with our host and guest on all their websites and social media networks.

American Horticultural Society - visit their website and connect on Twitter and Facebook

David Mizejewski for the National Wildlife Federation - visit his website to for upcoming appearances, books and connect with him on social networks.

Topics: #Plantchat, gardening, American Horticultural Society, National Wildlife Federation, David Mizejewski

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